SaltwaterCentral

Register for FREE to Use our Offshore Fishing Resources
Select State -
Staff Online:
SaltwaterCentral
SaltwaterCentral
SaltwaterCentral
August 18, 2017 3:20 am EST
Location: 33.436N 77.743W
Wind Dir: SW (230°)
Wind Speed: 12 knots
Wind Gust: 16 knots
AT Ps: 29.93 in (1013.6 mb)
Air Temp: 84°F (29.1°C)
Dew Point: 81°F (27.0°C)
Water Temp: 84°F (28.9°C)

SaltwaterCentral
There are currently 566 Guests and 24 Members online NOW!


MOREHEAD CITY – Coastal recreational fishermen hooked fewer fish in 2016 than they did in 2015.
 
Anglers brought an estimated 8.5 million fish to the docks in 2016, a decrease of 18 percent from 2015.
 
The estimated weight of these landings inched up, increasing by 2 percent to 12.2 million pounds. Anglers also released 1.5 percent more fish in 2016 than in 2015.
 
Fishermen also took 16.2 percent more fishing trips in 2016 than they did in 2015. This trend continued even in the fall following Hurricane Matthew.
 
The top five recreational species harvested, by pounds, remained the same as in 2015. They were dolphin, bluefish, yellowfin tuna, cobia and wahoo.
 
Yellowfin tuna harvest increased 145 percent from 2015. Anglers harvested 60,134 yellowfin tuna with a total weight of 2.3 million pounds. Bluefish harvests increased by 18 percent to 1.2 million fish (862,558 pounds), and wahoo harvests increased by 21 percent to 23,809 fish (640,807 pounds).
 
Landings for two of the top five species decreased significantly.
 
Anglers harvested 263,278 dolphin, with a total weight of 2.8 million pounds in 2016. That was a 39.4 percent decrease in the number of dolphin anglers brought to the docks. This dip in harvest may have resulted from the greater availability of yellowfin tuna and other offshore species, such as king mackerel, wahoo and blackfin tuna.
 
Also, the number of cobia landed fell by 42.5 percent, in 2016 to 9,288 fish (293,544 pounds).
 
In another notable change, estimated spotted seatrout harvests for 2016 increased by 342 percent over 2015, which were the lowest recreational spotted seatrout landings on record. Anglers brought 386,021 (2.3 million pounds) spotted seatrout to the docks in 2016.
 
Landings can fluctuate from year-to year based on many factors, including environmental conditions and fishing effort.
 
The Division of Marine Fisheries estimates recreational fishing harvests through broad-based intercept surveys, where port agents talk to fishermen on the beach, at the piers and at boat ramps, and through mail surveys to license holders.

Last 30 NCDENR Articles

Commercial fishermen reminded to renew their licenses

State expands nationwide search for head of N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries

Anglers may receive a survey from the Division of Marine Fisheries

Coastal recreational fishermen hooked fewer fish in 2016

Shrimp catches and sales soared, but overall commercial landings lower in 2016

Public comments sought on new oyster sanctuary/fishing reef in Hyde County

Conditions right for trout cold stun events

ASMFC American Eel Board Approves North Carolina Aquaculture Plan for 2016

Marine Fisheries Commission seeks advisers

Advisory Committees to Meet Jointly to Discuss Petition to Reclassify Coastal Wa





State observers out gathering information by watching anglers fish

Marine Fisheries Commission Continues to Seek Advisers

Marine Fisheries Commission Chooses Draft Management Measures for Blue Crab

Marine Fisheries Commission Meeting Set for Morehead City

Public Hearings Scheduled for Snapper Grouper Amendment 18A

COMMERCIAL LANDINGS DOWN; DOCKSIDE VALUE UP IN 2007

Recreational Fishing License (CRFL) Advisory Committee

RED DRUM FISH PRINTS STILL AVAILABLE FOR SALE

Red Drum Fishery Management Plan (FMP) Advisory Committee

DEADLINE APPROACHES FOR WATERFRONT ACCESS IDEAS

MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION TO MEET IN PINE KNOLL SHORES

Federal Fishery Advisory Panel Seats Open to Applicants

TEMPORARY SUSPENSION OF RULE â€

Southern Shrimp Alliance Town Hall Meetings:

STATE RELEASES REPORT CARD ON HEALTH OF FISHERIES

Removal of Cape Fear River Locks and Dams Could Improve Fish Populations

Coastal Habitat Protection Plan (CHPP) Steering Committee

NCMFC Finfish Advisory Committee

Outer Banks Center for Wildlife Education Unveils New Exhibits

Record-Breaking Rainbow Trout Caught in Jackson County